ENUF blogs

Research has many purposes, to learn, to evidence, to inform and to, hopefully, change. As researchers exploring problems of insecure food access in the UK, many of us are questioning how we can engage and meaningfully contribute to tackling the rising problem of food insecurity during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The global Covid-19 pandemic is affecting countries across the world. In this context, along with the enormous health challenges it brings, we are also facing significant economic and social impacts. Early indications are that crisis has already had a dramatic impact on levels of household food insecurity in the UK and governments and charities across Europe are working out ways to meet increasing needs in local communities.

Today, with the Food Foundation, we’ve published a preliminary analysis of vulnerability to food insecurity since the COVID-19 lockdown in the UK. This analysis uses data from a YouGov survey commissioned by the Food Foundation and collected over 7-9 April 2020.

By Rachel Loopstra

One of the major developments for research and policy on UK household food insecurity in the past months has been the news that household food insecurity will be measured on the Family Resources Survey going forward. And no time has been wasted: with new data being collected from April 2019 forward, food insecurity measurement is already underway.

As the body of research on household food insecurity in the UK grows, we’ve identified a need for a resource that provides up-to-date facts and figures on this critical issue. As interventions are being designed and policy asks are being formulated, it is critical that research informs this work.

This is a blog post by Courtney Scott of the Food Foundation - reproduced here with permission.


TODAY in parliament, Emma Lewell-Buck MP will be giving a first reading of the Ten Minute Rule Bill on the measurement of household food insecurity.  The Bill is asking the government to regularly measure levels of food insecurity in the UK, something that, until now, has been done infrequently and without leading to action.